The War on Drugs

The War on Drugs, made official by President Nixon in 1971, has continued on to this day. But, at what cost to American liberty? And, should we as Christians support this war? First, the cost to American freedom. Ever since the War on Drugs began the police and the government have become more and more involved in our lives. The search power of police has been increasingly more and more abused over the years. Also, the corruption among the police has increased as well, as police departments all over the country have incorporated money confiscated from drug addicts and drug gangs into their budgets. And, since they need the money, drug gangs can pay the police for protection from competition. The CIA was recently exposed to have received money and intelligence from a particular drug cartel in exchange for protection by U.S. forces. Many U.S. soldiers in Afghanistan have come back with the intelligence that our soldiers are protecting poppy fields, and this statement has been verified by statistics which show that heroin production in Afghanistan has increased 500x since the U.S. invasion. Coincidence? I think not.

…Chihuahua state spokesman Guillermo Terrazas Villanueva told Al Jazeera that the CIA and other international “security” outfits “don’t fight drug traffickers.” Instead, Villanueva argued, they try to control and manage the illegal drug market for their own benefit. The New American, July 28, 2012

U.S. Marines with Fox Company, 2nd Battalion, 5th Marine Regiment, Regimental Combat Team 6, patrol through a poppy field on their way to Patrol Base (PB) Mohmon in the Lui Tal district, Helmand province, Afghanistan, April 17, 2012. The Marines joined with coalition forces at the PB to begin conducting operations in the area. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Lance Cpl. Ismael E. Ortega/Released)
U.S. Marines with Fox Company, 2nd Battalion, 5th Marine Regiment, Regimental Combat Team 6, patrol through a poppy field on their way to Patrol Base (PB) Mohmon in the Lui Tal district, Helmand province, Afghanistan, April 17, 2012. The Marines joined with coalition forces at the PB to begin conducting operations in the area. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Lance Cpl. Ismael E. Ortega/Released)

Just think… what would happen if the police stopped prosecuting victimless crimes (as in there being no one hurt or affected except the offender) and went after real criminals, such as robbers, murderers, and the like? (The U.S. Government has even admitted that most murderers and thieves get away repeatedly from crimes.) First, we would see the price of illegal drugs plummet, since the risk of being caught is no longer there. This would do several things; (1) remove the incentive to kill and destroy to smuggle drugs around, (2) families would have much more money to spend, making society richer (3) the police would no longer have the incentive to protect big drug dealers from competition. Second, the police state that has formed in order to execute justice on drug offenders would no longer be necessary. This means that the rights of the individual would no longer be infringed unnecessarily and unlawfully by the government and police. Third, people would stop taking legal drugs, which are at least 10x more dangerous than illegal drugs, and go to a less risky alternative, such as marijuana. Now, should Christians support the War on Drugs? Yes, we as Christians should strongly avoid drugs of any kind, legal or non-legal, for fear of an addiction. We are to be in control of our bodies so that we can yield that control to Jesus. However, I have several reasons against those supporting prohibition. First, we need to understand what government is for. “For he is the minister of God to thee for good. But if thou do that which is evil, be afraid; for he beareth not the sword in vain: for he is the minister of God, a revenger to execute wrath upon him that doeth evil.” (Romans 13:4 KJV) So, we know that government is for evil doers (i.e. murderers, thieves). The only crime most drug offenders commit is taking the drug, and harming themselves. They typically do not harm anyone else. Since the only biblical function of government is to “execute wrath upon him that doeth evil”, we know that we cannot just make anything a crime. Second, we should beware using Government to achieve our means. We as Christians should be very fearful in wielding the sword that the State bears. It has been used successfully by the enemy to slay millions of believers and unbelievers in the past, and it is most likely going to continue. When we give the State the power to search peoples homes and other property for drugs, we’re giving them the ability to do that to us in the future. Instead of building our own scaffold, we should seek to dismantle the State’s ability to rob, kill, and destroy, and use merely its Romans 13 function of administering justice upon evil doers. This third point and last point is very similar to my second. We cannot use the State to legislate morality. Christ told us how we are to change people, and that, surprisingly enough, is through the gospel. We cannot expect to change people using mammon or any other worldly means. For instance, drug abuse amongst high school students is steadily increasing despite the law system and the police state in place. When people have a desire for something, no matter what it is, they’re going to find a way to get it, and they are only going to be driven to commit crime after crime to do so. Instead of seeking to shackle the outer man, we must seek to reach the inner man with the gospel of Jesus Christ, and change the natural desire found there to do evil. Then, and only then, can we truly end the War on Drugs.

Advertisements

One thought on “The War on Drugs

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s